teachers Archives | Cordell & Cordell

Bringing children back to school after a divorce

A lot of excitement, anxiety and perhaps dread face children as they head back to school in the fall. However, children whose parents have just gone through a divorce over the summer can face other challenges when returning to school. According to Erin Mantz, a Huffington Post contributor, it is important for recently divorced parents to talk to the child’s teacher.

Parents must balance the right amount of information to share with a teacher because of the sensitive family matters involved. With too much information shared, parents may worry that their children’s teachers might peg the kids as a potential problem because they now come from a broken home. However, just enough information can allow the teachers to keep an eye out for sad moods or erratic behavior.

According to the University of Missouri, teachers can better support divorced parents and their children by creating a welcoming atmosphere in the classroom for all types of parents. The atmosphere should also include involvement by all adults that play an important role in a student’s life. It is also important for teachers to communicate with both parents so no messages are lost and one parent doesn’t feel forgotten.

Conversations between parents and teachers could be nixed from child custody cases

A new law proposed in Wisconsin would keep all communication between parents and teachers from being used in child custody cases, the Superior Telegram reports.

Written and verbal communications between a parent and a child’s teacher would no longer be permissible in court during custody battles, which will hopefully lead to a trusting relationship between teachers and parents, according to Jim Steineke, the Kaukauna Republican behind the bill. The only exception would be in cases regarding neglect or abuse.

Parents aren’t the only ones who will feel safer to communicate under this proposed legislation. Teachers will also be more free to communicate without fear of getting dragged into court over something they had discussed with a parent.

Some in the state argue that the bill may not even be necessary, stating that teachers are often not particularly useful in custody cases.

According to the New Jersey State Bar Foundation, educators must often act like mental health professionals. It is important that teachers understand the emotional impact divorce has on children. Teachers must also be able to recognize symptoms in students indicating their families are changing.