children Archives | Cordell & Cordell

Men’s Divorce Podcast: Helping Kids Through Divorce

Men's Divorce PodcastEach month, the Cordell & Cordell Men’s Divorce Podcast features interviews with authors, politicians and other divorce professionals on issues men face during the divorce process.  [Read more…]

Joe Cordell Shares The Truth About Prenups With Huffington Post

prenuptial agreementOnce seen as an inducement to divorce, and thus a detriment to marriage, prenuptial agreements are now treated as a strength for marriage, though they are not for everyone, according to Joseph Cordell’s latest column on HuffingtonPost.com.

“There’s a popular perception that prenuptial agreements are a cynical way to enter into a marriage,” Cordell wrote in his post “What You Need To Know About Prenups.” “It’s true that prenups recognize the possibility of divorce, but with roughly half of all marriages ending in divorce you would be ignoring reality if you didn’t attempt to protect your interests before tying the knot.”

In general, there are four factors to consider when deciding whether you should pursue a prenup.

1. Age of the parties: the older you are, the more likely you need one.
2. Children from a previous relationship: a prenup is always a good tool to protect the financial future of children from prior marriages or relationships, but these agreements are not allowed to regulate issues relating to children of the future marriage, such as child custody.
3. Presence of substantial assets: the more assets you have, the more likely you need a prenup.
4. Disparity of assets: if there is a large disparity in assets between the two parties, then you want a prenup.

Read more about prenuptial agreements and whether such an agreement befits your situation on HuffingtonPost.com.

Joe Cordell: One Factor That Will Help Your Custody Case

Joseph CordellTeachers are often called into court to testify regarding parental involvement in the children’s lives, particularly the educational aspect. The best thing you can do for yourself and your child is to ensure that you are not cut out of your child’s education, according to Cordell & Cordell CEO Joseph Cordell’s latest Huffington Post column.

“More often than not, it is the mother who has the time to volunteer at school to help out,” Cordell writes. “It’s Mom who usually is the one the school calls, who handles carpool, who drops off the snacks. Teachers see moms do this every day. Fair or unfair, when a dad does these things, it sticks out because few dads do so.”

As Cordell recommends in his book “The 10 Stupidest Mistakes Men Make When Facing Divorce,” make sure your kids’ teachers get used to seeing you.

It may just make the difference in your custody case.

Read the full article “Want Custody Of Your Kids? Get Involved With Their School!

Sticking together for the children may not be the best option

Although some couples who are trapped in a loveless marriage may think that sticking together is what is best for their children, the opposite can actually be true.

According to the Muskegon Chronicle, children are more perceptive than we often give them credit for, and can tell when a situation is deteriorating.

“If the relationship is so unhealthy … it’s not a good situation for the children,” Susan P. Johnson, chief executive of Every Woman’s Place in Muskegon, said. “We have a tendency to think kids somehow through their immaturity don’t understand that something’s going on. There’s a ton of research that shows that’s not the case.”

Although the statistics point to many marriages in Muskegon County ending earlier than in previous generations, Johnson noted that this was because couples in the 1960s did not have the resources or knowledge to divorce when things reached a breaking point, the news source reported.

The Day reported that children may be better off with parents who split instead of staying together despite many differences, as they will benefit from a more positive environment and less stress.

Coping strategies for sharing custody of children

Parenting is difficult enough when both individuals are married and present to raise their child. This makes creating a peaceful environment for kids after a divorce even harder, as tension between the former couple can end up hurting the development of the child.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Judy Corcoran, co-author of a book titled “Joint Custody with a Jerk” noted that sustaining a peaceful environment for children is essential, despite how difficult it might be for both parents.

“You actually hate the person’s guts by this time,” Corcoran told the newspaper. “So that’s what we teach, how to communicate with this person.”

Though Judy Corcoran is a divorcee and a single parent, she noted that this “jerk” can be both a female or male, as both sexes can be responsible for creating this negative environment for a child.

Corcoran met the co-author Julia A. Ross at Parenting Horizons, an organization that helps divorced adults reconcile to the point where they can still be effective parents and have a positive impact on their child, according to the organization’s website.