Associated Press Archives | Cordell & Cordell

Omaha Divorce Attorney Jerrad Ahrens Discusses Bill Regarding Protection Orders

Associated PressCordell & Cordell family law attorney Jerrad R. Ahrens recently was quoted in an Associated Press article regarding a bill being introduced in Nebraska that would clarify the state’s law on protection orders. [Read more…]

Attorney Jennifer Paine Contributes to AP article, Discusses Divorce Parties

associated pressCordell & Cordell’s Ann Arbor-based attorney Jennifer Paine contributed to an Associated Press story about divorce parties.

The article, titled “Today’s divorces can mean cake and eating it, too,” explains the rise of parties and festivities that celebrate divorce. While most recently published in The Denver Post, the story is owned by AP and will be featured in multiple publications across the country.

In the article, Paine explained how divorce celebrations and cakes can represent a fresh start on life.

“For divorce, that means the final date of divorce, when all of the hard work and emotions are over,” she said. “It used to mean going out with buddies. Then there was the era of sending a divorce card, then the trip to Las Vegas, and now parties.”

Find the complete article online.

North Carolina candidate asks for examination on timing of jail sentence

A man who lost his bid for a seat on the Hertford, North Carolina, town council has asked state officials to examine the timing of his arrest by the local sheriff’s department over less than $1,700 in child support payments, the Associated Press reported.

The court order that landed the candidate in prison on the day of the election was allegedly five months old, and Quentin Jackson is wondering why they waited till this specific time to arrest him, according to the news outlet.

“It just feels bad to be portrayed as a bad guy trying to skip out on some child support,” Jackson told WTKR 3 News.

Jackson said that his lack of money has prevented him from making the payments, along with the bills for the apartment where the kids stay with their mother.

“Their mom, she lives in an apartment. She doesn’t have to pay any rent. She [doesn’t] have to pay any light bills. She doesn’t have to pay any bills – I take care of that,” Jackson told the news source.

Former lesbian’s custody case turns manhunt

A child custody case has become a global manhunt after a lesbian-turned-evangelical Christian disappeared with the daughter after splitting up with her partner and renouncing homosexuality, according to The Associated Press.

The story began in 2000 after the woman, Lisa Miller, was joined in a civil union in Vermont. Two years later Miller gave birth to their daughter, who was conceived via artificial insemination, before the couple broke up in 2004 when Miller renounced her homosexuality and joined the Mennonite church.

A federal arrest warrant was issued for Miller after she failed to show for a court-ordered custody swap in January 2010, reported the AP. Miller reportedly took her daughter to Nicaragua in 2009 before vanishing again, which authorities believe she has managed with the help of religious groups. The FBI recently apprehended Nicaraguan missionary Timothy David “Timo” Miller, who is has been charged with abetting an international kidnapping by arranging travel and lodging for Miller in Central America.

“It is hard to understand how anyone could consider a childhood on the run better and more stable than one surrounded by family, with two parents and two sets of grandparents who can provide love and support,” Jenkins wrote in an email to the news source.

Determining child custody among gay couples is an issue divorce lawyers are still investigating. Following the passage of same-sex marriage in New York, divorce lawyers told multiple media outlets that child custody between lesbian couples in situations where only one woman is biologically related to the child may pose some legal complications in court.

McCourts file requests in Dodgers divorce

Jamie McCourt, the ex-wife of Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt, has asked a judge to order the sale of the baseball team.

Jamie claimed that her former husband mismanaged the team after firing her as club CEO in 2009, according to The Associated Press.

Frank has a request of his own for Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon, asking that he approve the club’s lucrative television contract or prevent Jamie from interfering in the deal.

Gordon set a date of June 22 to hear both of the issues.

However, the Los Angeles Times reports that may be too late for the Dodgers because Major League Baseball, which is already running the club, could seize the team if it fails to meet May 31 payroll.

“If [Frank] doesn’t make payroll, it’s over,” a person close to MLB Commissioner Bud Selig told the news source.

The television contract is reportedly worth more than $3 billion and would likely solve many of the club’s financial problems, reports the Times.

Jamie is claiming partial ownership of the Dodgers in one of the largest asset division cases in the U.S. in recent years.