Fathers' Rights

Colorado Springs

Cordell & Cordell is a partner dads can count on during one of the toughest challenges of their lives. The family law attorneys at our Colorado Springs, Colorado, office are dedicated to helping men with any divorce issue, including property division, alimony, child support and child custody.

Our mission is to give men the legal support they and their children deserve both in and out of the courtroom.

Divorce Attorneys Dedicated to Helping Men

Divorce takes an emotional toll on everyone, no matter how tough you are. The decisions you make during this time will have an enormous impact on you financially for the rest of your life.

More importantly, your level of involvement in your children’s lives can also be affected. Our attorneys take the time to listen to your concerns and work diligently to champion your rights and the rights of your children in family court.

We know how critical this transition is and promise to walk you through each step of the process while doing everything possible to protect what’s most important to you.

Advocates For Dad’s Rights and Fathers’ Rights

Since 1990, Cordell & Cordell has fought against numerous stereotypes that men and fathers face in the family court system. Our firm’s focus on men’s divorce gives our attorneys a unique understanding of the challenges men face in a Colorado family law courtroom.

Despite battling a system that seems predisposed against them, Cordell & Cordell has risen to establish ourselves as a partner men can count on.

Military
At Cordell & Cordell, we understand the unique challenges military families face during divorce.

Client Testimonials

5/5

“I am extremely happy with [my attorney]. She communicated with me regularly. She advocated for my needs and helped explained the legal process along the way. [My attorney] was very easy to talk to and helped me through a tremendously difficult time.”

5/5

“… She is truly amazing! She is so good at following up. I never have to reach out to her to find out what’s going on with my case. From day one, Amanda had a plan. She’s never given us false hope and has always been on top of things! Amanda always presents all of the options. She tells us what she would recommend but always asks us what we’d be most comfortable with. Amanda couldn’t be better! … This experience has been nothing but pleasurable. Amanda is worth every penny we’ve paid. I just wish I’d found her sooner!”

5/5

“She has done very good. We have had some items come up where she’s helped me deal with them. It has been nothing but the best experience on my end so far. I originally was not going to use an attorney, but my wife then hired one and I heard the ads on the radio and thought that C&C sounded ‘great.’ Granted, I had to wait a bit until your VA Office got started, but very glad that I did and it’s been worth the wait. It’s been a difficult time in my life and Rebecca and the team have made it easier. …”

 

Frequently Asked Colorado Springs Divorce Questions

How long do I have to live in Colorado Springs before I can file for divorce?

Colorado Springs does not have a specific residency requirement, but it is subject to a 90-day state of Colorado residency requirement.

Is there a mandatory waiting period in Colorado Springs before a divorce can be granted? How long will a divorce take?

The mandatory waiting period is 90 days.

Colorado rules do not allow any activity on the case to take place, other than the exchanging of financial information and the Initial Status Conference, for the first 40 days after the Petition is filed.

It would probably take a minimum of 2-5 months to get even the least complex divorces finalized and at least 6-12 months to finalize complex divorces. Some cases take well over a year if there are contested child custody issues, substantial amounts of property to divide, and other such issues.

How can I serve my spouse in Colorado Springs? If attempts to serve do not work, can I serve by publication?

You would serve your spouse by utilizing a private process server or a sheriff/constable.

You can serve by publication by filing a motion with the court that meets certain requirements, including attaching affidavits or other evidence to substantiate what efforts you made to personally serve your spouse and obtaining a court order to allow you to serve the other party by publication.

In Colorado Springs, the notice would typically be published in the Denver Post because it’s a national publication that would (theoretically) provide notice to persons both in and outside of the state of Colorado.

What are the specific forms I will need to file for a divorce in Colorado Springs?

In Colorado Springs (El Paso County), you have to file a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage, a Case Information Sheet, and a Summons to begin a divorce action and you have to serve all of them on the other party.

In addition, you would also serve on the other party at the same time a Domestic Relations Case Management Order, an Order to Parents, and a Notice of Applicability.

Where do I file for divorce in El Paso County?

All divorce cases have to be filed with the Office of the District Clerk in whichever Judicial District the county of residence lies, which will then assign the case to a particular division of the District Court in that county (assuming that county has more than one division).

However, many counties, such as El Paso, now require that all documents be e-filed in all divisions rather than physically being paper-filed with the Clerk’s Office (though most counties give pro se litigants some leeway on this, at least as to the initial filing).

For El Paso County, you need to file at the Clerk’s Office located in the courthouse at 270 S. Tejon St. in Colorado Springs.

How much are the filing fees in El Paso County?

Filing fees are $230 to file a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage.

Are there any El Paso County-Specific laws that are different from how other family law cases around the state are handled?

Although local customs and standards of practice often differ by county and/or division, there are no legal or procedural rules that differ because all of them are promulgated and applied on a statewide basis.