Michigan Supreme Court targets child support flaws

The Michigan Supreme Court will work to examine potential flaws in the state’s child support system following three cases that were presented to the legislative body on Oct. 6, The Detroit News reported.

Several Michigan parents argued they were unfairly sentenced because the courts will not allow evidence showing that it was impossible for them to pay child support, according to the news source.

The cases were targeted at the difficult standards that are in place for parents that have their child support payments modified, as the lawyers noted that these were next-to-impossible to reach under the current law.

“You have to be in a coma or kidnapped by Afghani terrorists,” John Bursch, solicitor general for Michigan, told the news source after defending a client against the high standard of proof. “(Defendants) have an extremely high burden of proof.”

While this case was specifically centered around a woman who was charged with exorbitant fees despite her financial situation reported mental instability, a majority of these incidents feature men. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that men are granted custody in only 17.4 percent of cases and thus pay the vast majority of child support.