Massachusetts Alimony Reform Makes Waves

Massachusetts’ new alimony reform bill could be the model for future alimony laws in other states, and its provisions could be a welcome relief for ex-spouses burdened with alimony payments for years, says a divorce attorney in a recent Huffington Post article.

The bill, which survived the Massachusetts House of Representatives, could mean an end to lifetime spousal support after a divorce if it passes the Senate. This new post-divorce law could inspire other states to do the same.

“It is high time that the rest of the country took note,” the attorney wrote. “Why is it that one person is permitted to sit back and collect alimony long after the marriage, and often requiring the other spouse to continue working to support that individual?”

Massachusetts has long been on the cutting-edge of family law. The state passed a law allowing same-sex marriage in 2004, becoming the first U.S. state to do so. Since then, Iowa, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont, Washington D.C. and New York now allow it.

Regarding alimony law, the divorce lawyer hopes that a system will spread that limits the amount of time spousal support is expected, as this provision is designed to help the other spouses survive financially until they can support themselves.